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Saturday, December 20 2014 @ 12:49 AM EST
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Whaling seen as threat to scavengers

DEEP-SEA SCAVENGING
DEEP-SEA SCAVENGING
In 2004, marine biologists discovered two strange new worms 9,000 feet down at the bottom of Monterey Bay Canyon. They were bizarre for many reasons - they had no eyes, legs, mouths or stomachs - but also because they were, with the help of symbiotic bacteria, feasting off a dead gray whale.

The worms, whose Latin name means "bone devourer," sport reddish feathery plumes that behave like gills. At the other end, the worm's body forms a large egg sac with greenish roots sprouting from it. The roots are filled with bacteria that break down the oil in whale bones.
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'Dossier' is a doozie

APOCALYPSE NOW
APOCALYPSE NOW
"Apocalypse Now: The Complete Dossier" (Paramount, 4 stars).

Francis Ford Coppola gives us glimpses into the shadows that fell between the idea and the release of one of the greatest movies of all time.

However, the three-year epic struggle to make this film - nearly a personal apocalypse for Coppola - results in a mere DVD two-disc set that includes the two official versions of the film - the 1979 original and the controversial "Apocalypse Now Redux" from 2001 - and a hefty handful of features.
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Shooting the moon

MEASURING THE MOON
MEASURING THE MOON
On July 21, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin propped an array of reflectors in the lunar soil - one of several science experiments they deployed a day after becoming the first humans to set foot on the moon.

A month later, a small group of astronomers bounced a pulse of laser light off the reflectors and caught the return signal with a telescope at Lick Observatory near San Jose, in Northern California. By measuring the time it took for the pulse traveling at the speed of light to return, scientists could determine the distance between the Earth and moon.
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Meth cooks take pride in creating 'devil's drug'

METH PRODUCTION
METH PRODUCTION
With the gentle touch of Wolfgang Puck, the zeal of Emeril and the bravado of Julia Child, chefs every day whip up batches of a drug that can be snorted, smoked, injected, even eaten.

On the streets, it's called crank, ice, pink.
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Chevy's Mr. Big: Much-improved Suburban improves (a bit) on mileage

CHEVY SUBURBAN
CHEVY SUBURBAN
Anyone who has ever slammed the hood of an old Chevy truck will realize how far GM truck construction has improved with the 2007 Chevrolet Suburban.

Body panel gaps are so tight now that owners need a lesson in how to close the hood: gently.

Slamming could have an impact on the grille, so GM engineers added a strut under the hood for a little downforce resistance. Now, just lower the hood and give a little push to latch.
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Paint adds personality to a lackluster porch

CHARMING AS ALL OUTDOORS
CHARMING AS ALL OUTDOORS
Q: We have a funky little screened-in porch off the kitchen of our new house. I'd like to make it more attractive, but we don't want to spend much money (it is a rental). What can we do, short of expensive construction?

A: Contrary to the saying, occasionally, beauty really is only surface deep. Think paint. It's quick and cheap, and you can always return things to their original gray when you move, if your landlord insists.
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Researchers look to sea floor as source of new antibiotics

NEW DRUG DISCOVERIES
NEW DRUG DISCOVERIES
The bottom of the ocean can be a dark, cold and muddy place, but this forbidding environment could hold life-saving antibiotics derived from organisms that scientists have never seen.

Now the University of California San Diego will soon undertake an ambitious effort to fast-track the process of discovering new compounds from the sea floor to turn them into antibiotics. University officials will draw from talent at their Scripps Institution of Oceanography and their schools of pharmacy and medicine. They also will enlist the support of San Diego County's biotech community and venture capitalists.
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Decorating with the rough-n-tumble in mind

BOYS’ ROOM
BOYS’ ROOM
Q: My husband's daughter has triplet boys, now almost 8 years old. We love to have them come visit, but staying over for any length of time is becoming a problem as they get bigger and threaten to outgrow the sleeper in the den. We've decided to turn the whole den over to them, make it "their" fun place when they come. But it's been a long time since I decorated for kids. Suggestions would be welcome.
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Hurricane Katrina expert sees more ill winds blowing

EYE ON THE STORM
EYE ON THE STORM
Ivor van Heerden, deputy director of the Louisiana State University Hurricane Center, has studied the geography of southeast Louisiana for decades. Long before last summer, he told state, local and federal officials that New Orleans would be vulnerable to a direct-hit hurricane. Much of what he feared would happen came true when Katrina struck in August.

The state of Louisiana later named the LSU Hurricane Center to lead an investigation of Katrina levee failures. Van Heerden heads a team of engineers and coastal scientists who are analyzing storm-surge levels and levee construction.
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Mustang Magic: It's new, better - and packed with memories of old

FORD MUSTANG
FORD MUSTANG
The new Mustang is a memory machine: retro done right.

It is modern and functional, even comfortable for a sporty car. The doors are not too large for entry and exit in a crowded mall parking.

The swoop of the roofline doesn't cramp views that are enabled by the quarter windows in the sail panels. The wide trunk will handle far more than groceries, and with the convertible there's luggage room even when the top is folded inside.
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How to make a cavernous room cozy

BIG JOB, BIG SOLUTION
BIG JOB, BIG SOLUTION
Q: Our huge living room has 14-foot ceilings that dwarf all the furniture we moved in from our previous house. I added a big chandelier and bought the largest painting I could find for over the sofa, but still we don't feel comfortable sitting in there. I'm guessing the answer might be a giant armoire or tall bookcases, but we are more strapped than we expected after the move. What else can we do to cozy-up this space? Paint stripes on the walls or what?

A: Nix stripes, unless you paint them sideways, going around the room horizontally. That would lower your sights and keep the center of attention more or less at eye level.
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Layering 101 will teach you classy fall looks

LAYERING
LAYERING
It's a subject you need to brush up on this fall for your favorite fashion classes: layering 101. As more and more of our wardrobes have to work harder and harder, carrying us through season after season in all kinds of weather, the fashion basics have become the starting point to a wardrobe that gets an A-plus.

But the course in putting it all together is not easy. As consumers insist on being creative and expressing their own individual style, designers are offering "pieces" that work on their own or "layered," especially in cooler weather, with a variety of fashion statements that give the wearer that unique, one-of-a-kind look - the look that says: "Yes, I've mastered this layering thing. I can put it all together myself."
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Taking cover: Sunscreen is just part of the picture

TAKE COVER
TAKE COVER
If your idea of sun protection is a quick coating of sunscreen, it's time to rethink your defense strategy.

Relying solely on a dollop of sunscreen to protect your skin from the ravages of the sun is a little like counting on a lap seat belt to completely protect you in a car crash. While both are necessary and can help minimize damage, they're only a part of a smart protection plan.

"Most people don't apply sunscreen often enough or in a large enough quantity to really give protection," says Dr. Kimberly Butterwick, a San Diego dermatologist. "If people would double-up and triple-up on their sun protection - wear clothing, hats and sunglasses, in addition to sunscreen - they could manage to get the kind of sun protection they really need."
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'Inside Man' a tense thriller with big-league cast

INSIDE MAN
INSIDE MAN
When everybody is going by the book, it's really easy to know how to break the rules.

Take Dalton Russell (Clive Owen) in the Spike Lee-directed action-thriller "Inside Man" (Universal, 3 stars). He knows the book. He knows exactly how New York cops will respond when he and his crew walk into the Manhattan Trust Bank and hold the place up.
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Spinal decompression gives neck, back pain sufferers an alternative to surgery

SPINAL THERAPY
SPINAL THERAPY
There was a time in Sharon Kentzel's life when the mere act of walking across a room would bring on excruciating pain.

After a bad fall in 1991 that left her with a broken ankle, a broken nose and terrible back pain, Kentzel couldn't get up from a chair and could barely walk.

"I'd be embarrassed to go to a restaurant. I'd go to pay the bill and couldn't get up," she said. "I'd get out of my car to go get gas and I'd have to wait a minute before I could walk."

The broken bones have since healed, but the nagging pain in her lumbar region remained.
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Archaeological chemistry combines two sciences into one powerful tool

ELEMENTAL EXCAVATION
ELEMENTAL EXCAVATION
Romantic ideas of archaeology tend to be outdoors in nature, adventurous excursions to lost cities, ancient tombs and, occasionally, temples of doom. Chemistry, by contrast, rarely conjures up such notions: Laboratory all-nighters with centrifuges whirring just aren't that stirring.

But the relatively young marriage of these two sciences - only a few decades old - has developed into a deep and sometimes revealing relationship.

It was radiocarbon dating, invented by University of Chicago chemist Willard Libby in 1949, that gave archaeologists the ability to determine the "absolute age" of unearthed artifacts.
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Java's cup runneth over with health benefits

THE PERKS OF COFFEE
THE PERKS OF COFFEE
If you think bitter-tasting wheatgrass juice or pungent herbal tea concoctions are your only healthy beverage choices, it's time to wake up and taste the coffee. A good ol' cup of joe or two may be just what the doctor ordered.

Once believed to stunt growth, cause cancer and trigger heart attacks, recent research indicates that coffee may be a powerful elixir. Our favorite brew has been shown to prevent diabetes, liver damage and gallstones, plus it may also improve physical endurance and pump up your brain power.

"Not only is coffee not bad for our health, as once believed, coffee may actually have a healthy protective effect," says Cheryl Rock, researcher and professor of nutrition at University of California San Diego's School of Medicine.
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Unsportsmanlike conduct

THE BENCHWARMERS
THE BENCHWARMERS
Somewhere deep in the video vaults there must be a movie about a loveable ragtag bunch of losers who band together to play the bad guys in a game of something or other - and get the living snot beaten out of them. No victory, not even a moral one. Just loss and further humiliation and the hands of bullies.

I'm sure it was very unpopular.
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Underneath it all, 'Shaggy Dog' not a bad story

SHAGGY DOG
SHAGGY DOG
The first thing we need to understand is this is not your father's "Shaggy Dog" (Disney, 2.5 stars). That one was made in 1959 and was terrific for its time, what with a cast led by Fred MacMurray, Kirk Russell, Annette Funicello and Tim Considine.

That was a classic Disney family movie (back when Disney and "family" were synonymous).
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Cherry, crimson, claret, ruby … red enlivens wilted summer looks

RED ALL OVER
RED ALL OVER
Don't let the heat and humidity dampen your summer wardrobe. Just add a warm splash of red to freshen up this season's wardrobe and you'll be ahead of this fall's fashion scene that touts red as one of its hottest colors, too.

Here are a few ways to wear red now and into fall:

GO FOR ACCENTS: Got a black or white dress that you're wearing now, but doesn't quite have that punch you need? Wrap it up with red as a rich accent to your waist. Cinch your middle with a wide obi-style sash dripping with fringe or a thick red leather belt decorated with metallic studs.

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