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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine
Thursday, April 26 2018 @ 09:00 PM EDT
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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine
Thursday, April 26 2018 @ 09:00 PM EDT
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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine

Journal of Vascular Surgery Highlights Findings Of Physicians From Englewood Hospital


Two physicians from Englewood Hospital and Medical Center, vascular surgeon Herbert Dardik, MD, and advanced laparoscopist Ibrahim M. Ibrahim, MD, have had their findings on an unusual surgical procedure published in the October 2011 issue of the prestigious Journal of Vascular Surgery. The article recounts a complex case in which the surgeons saved the leg of a 64-year-old man suffering from a serious infection following leg bypass surgery to correct severe damage caused by atherosclerosis.

“After a successful series of steps to treat the infection, we came to an impasse,” said Dr. Dardik. “In simplest terms, you might say the final healing process was stalled and incomplete. We decided to close the wound using a novel approach.”

The physicians, both long-time innovators in their specialties, combined exceptional skills with state-of-the-art technology to move tissue with crucial healing potential down from within the patient’s abdomen through the body to the groin area, the site of the infection. The migration was accomplished using minimally invasive techniques instead of the conventional method of opening the abdominal wall.

The benefits of minimally invasive surgery are extensive and significant, said Dr. Ibrahim. Advantages include diminished post-op pain, reduced risk for blood clots, less scarring and a quicker return to normal activity. “We took a major, complicated operation and made it simple to the patient,” said Dr. Ibrahim, who specializes in minimally invasive abdominal surgery. The case outlined in the journal attests to Englewood Hospital’s exceptional care, continued the physician. “The surgery required a particular cadre of experts. It could not have been done at all hospitals.”

Dr. Dardik has served as chief of surgery at Englewood Hospital for a total of 22 years. He has been at the forefront of the hospital’s role as a leader in vascular surgery since the discipline’s early days. In fact, Englewood Hospital was in a select group when it qualified as the eighth training program in vascular surgery in the United States in 1978.

Dr. Dardik, who heads Englewood Hospital’s vascular surgery service and its coveted vascular fellowship program, has enjoyed his roles as researcher and innovator, both of which have come naturally to him, starting in medical school. “Ask the questions. Suddenly, the opportunity shows itself. Then, you do it,” he explains.

Yet, nothing has been more gratifying than “the pleasure” of taking care of a person and feeling his or her gratitude, said the physician, as he did for the patient in the journal article. “That never gets old, no matter how many times it happens,” said Dr. Dardik.

For more information:
“Vacuum-assisted closure therapy with omental transposition for salvage of infected prosthetic femoral-distal bypass involving the femoral anastomosis”
Journal of Vascular Surgery
Volume 54
October 2011

Images courtesy Englewood Hospital and Medical Center Herbert Dardik, MD Ibrahim M. Ibrahim, MD

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