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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine
Friday, July 03 2020 @ 09:34 PM EDT
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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine
Friday, July 03 2020 @ 09:34 PM EDT
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The Paramus Post - Greater Paramus News and Lifestyle Webzine

Whaling seen as threat to scavengers


DEEP-SEA SCAVENGING
DEEP-SEA SCAVENGING
In 2004, marine biologists discovered two strange new worms 9,000 feet down at the bottom of Monterey Bay Canyon. They were bizarre for many reasons - they had no eyes, legs, mouths or stomachs - but also because they were, with the help of symbiotic bacteria, feasting off a dead gray whale.

The worms, whose Latin name means "bone devourer," sport reddish feathery plumes that behave like gills. At the other end, the worm's body forms a large egg sac with greenish roots sprouting from it. The roots are filled with bacteria that break down the oil in whale bones.
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'Dossier' is a doozie


APOCALYPSE NOW
APOCALYPSE NOW
"Apocalypse Now: The Complete Dossier" (Paramount, 4 stars).

Francis Ford Coppola gives us glimpses into the shadows that fell between the idea and the release of one of the greatest movies of all time.

However, the three-year epic struggle to make this film - nearly a personal apocalypse for Coppola - results in a mere DVD two-disc set that includes the two official versions of the film - the 1979 original and the controversial "Apocalypse Now Redux" from 2001 - and a hefty handful of features.
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Shooting the moon


MEASURING THE MOON
MEASURING THE MOON
On July 21, 1969, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin propped an array of reflectors in the lunar soil - one of several science experiments they deployed a day after becoming the first humans to set foot on the moon.

A month later, a small group of astronomers bounced a pulse of laser light off the reflectors and caught the return signal with a telescope at Lick Observatory near San Jose, in Northern California. By measuring the time it took for the pulse traveling at the speed of light to return, scientists could determine the distance between the Earth and moon.
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Computer entrepreneur searches for gateway to knowledge


GOSPEL OF JUDAS
GOSPEL OF JUDAS
In April, the National Geographic Society announced that San Diego resident Ted Waitt had donated more than $1 million to fund the restoration and preservation of the Gospel of Judas manuscript.

Waitt, 43, is the founder and former CEO of Gateway Inc., the computer maker. The San Diego-based Waitt Family Foundation and Institutes are nonprofit organizations "dedicated to the improvement of mankind's knowledge through historical and scientific exploration." Copley News Service writer Diane Bell asked Waitt about his role in the Judas codex in an interview that was conducted via e-mail.
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Meth cooks take pride in creating 'devil's drug'


METH PRODUCTION
METH PRODUCTION
With the gentle touch of Wolfgang Puck, the zeal of Emeril and the bravado of Julia Child, chefs every day whip up batches of a drug that can be snorted, smoked, injected, even eaten.

On the streets, it's called crank, ice, pink.
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An open road, a smaller world


INTERSTATE TURNS 50
INTERSTATE TURNS 50
In America, a land of possibilities and second chances, settled by people who came from somewhere else, mobility has always meant freedom.

And for the past 50 years, the embodiment of that spirit has been the freeway.

The interstate highway system, a half-century old this summer, connected the coasts and everything in between, and accommodated Americans' desire to take charge of their destiny.

"It made the movement of America, which is such a quintessentially American feature of our consciousness, and it made it incredibly efficient," said Robert Thompson, a professor of popular culture at Syracuse University.
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Dr. Michael B. Yeun, a family dentist


Dr. Michael Yuen, Family Dentist
My good friend, Dr. Michael (Mike) Yeun has been in the same location, 366 Forest Avenue in Paramus for over 20 years. His corner is known for the white tooth on his lawn depicting his location. He came across this location through a fellow church member and has stayed there.

Mike graduated from UMDNJ in 1984, did a little apprenticing and then came to our town.
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Widow's diamond ring keeps husband's memory close by


EMOTIONAL MOMENT
EMOTIONAL MOMENT
When Patricia Biedenbach's husband Don died in September, she wasn't ready to let him go.

"I wanted him with me at all times," she said.

Her husband was cremated at his request, and Biedenbach kept the ashes. But the Canton, Ohio, resident wanted something else that could be close to her wherever she was. That's when she remembered an article she read about LifeGem, a company in Elk Grove Village, Ill., that uses the carbon found in the cremated remains of a person's body or hair to create diamonds. She asked the Reed Funeral Home about it following her husband's cremation.
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Housing and sports facilities are seen as a winning team


SPORTING VIEW
SPORTING VIEW
Longtime stock-car entrepreneur O. Bruton Smith looked puzzled when he was asked if he was bothered by the drone of the high-performance automobiles that circle Lowe's Motor Speedway.

"Oh no, no," Smith said with a smile. "When I hear noise, I know we're making more money."
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Researchers look to sea floor as source of new antibiotics


NEW DRUG DISCOVERIES
NEW DRUG DISCOVERIES
The bottom of the ocean can be a dark, cold and muddy place, but this forbidding environment could hold life-saving antibiotics derived from organisms that scientists have never seen.

Now the University of California San Diego will soon undertake an ambitious effort to fast-track the process of discovering new compounds from the sea floor to turn them into antibiotics. University officials will draw from talent at their Scripps Institution of Oceanography and their schools of pharmacy and medicine. They also will enlist the support of San Diego County's biotech community and venture capitalists.
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Hurricane Katrina expert sees more ill winds blowing


EYE ON THE STORM
EYE ON THE STORM
Ivor van Heerden, deputy director of the Louisiana State University Hurricane Center, has studied the geography of southeast Louisiana for decades. Long before last summer, he told state, local and federal officials that New Orleans would be vulnerable to a direct-hit hurricane. Much of what he feared would happen came true when Katrina struck in August.

The state of Louisiana later named the LSU Hurricane Center to lead an investigation of Katrina levee failures. Van Heerden heads a team of engineers and coastal scientists who are analyzing storm-surge levels and levee construction.
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Charlie Howard and the NY Swing Band


Charlie Howard & NY Swing Band
Thanks to the acumen of Tony Bucco and Len LoPinto, the latest showing of the Paramus Cultural Council was a show to see. We thought the Mahoney Bros., Jukebox Heroes was great, this show was on a par if not better. Played at the Westfield Garden State Plaza Bandshell, the audience was clapping, yelling ‘Bravo’ and even dancing on the perimeter.
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Mustang Magic: It's new, better - and packed with memories of old


FORD MUSTANG
FORD MUSTANG
The new Mustang is a memory machine: retro done right.

It is modern and functional, even comfortable for a sporty car. The doors are not too large for entry and exit in a crowded mall parking.

The swoop of the roofline doesn't cramp views that are enabled by the quarter windows in the sail panels. The wide trunk will handle far more than groceries, and with the convertible there's luggage room even when the top is folded inside.
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How to make a cavernous room cozy


BIG JOB, BIG SOLUTION
BIG JOB, BIG SOLUTION
Q: Our huge living room has 14-foot ceilings that dwarf all the furniture we moved in from our previous house. I added a big chandelier and bought the largest painting I could find for over the sofa, but still we don't feel comfortable sitting in there. I'm guessing the answer might be a giant armoire or tall bookcases, but we are more strapped than we expected after the move. What else can we do to cozy-up this space? Paint stripes on the walls or what?

A: Nix stripes, unless you paint them sideways, going around the room horizontally. That would lower your sights and keep the center of attention more or less at eye level.
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After the Wahoo


Wahoo 2006
On August 6th, a hot sunny day, the Paramus Municipal Pool Wahoo was held. Diving was divided into 4 categories: 8 & under, 9 – 11, 12 – 15 and 16 & up. The day was perfect for them. Matthew Frohnapfel was on hand wearing a Yankee shirt and Mayor Tedesco introduced him to everyone.
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Layering 101 will teach you classy fall looks


LAYERING
LAYERING
It's a subject you need to brush up on this fall for your favorite fashion classes: layering 101. As more and more of our wardrobes have to work harder and harder, carrying us through season after season in all kinds of weather, the fashion basics have become the starting point to a wardrobe that gets an A-plus.

But the course in putting it all together is not easy. As consumers insist on being creative and expressing their own individual style, designers are offering "pieces" that work on their own or "layered," especially in cooler weather, with a variety of fashion statements that give the wearer that unique, one-of-a-kind look - the look that says: "Yes, I've mastered this layering thing. I can put it all together myself."
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You Drink and Drive, You Lose 2006 Statewide Crackdown


You Drink & Drive, You Lose!
You Drink & Drive, You Lose!
From August 18 through September 4, 2006, law enforcement officers from the Paramus Police Department will be stepping up impaired driving enforcement as part of the You Drink and Drive, You Lose 2006 Statewide Crackdown.
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Bergen Community College Center for Business and Industry to Host a Free Busines


The Bergen Community College Center for Business and Industry is hosting a free business seminar titled “Making Change Stick”-- facilitated by Richard Reale, President of Positive Impact Associates, Inc.,-- Friday, September 15, 2006 from 8:30 a.m. until 12:00 p.m., at the Moses Family Meeting and Training Center at Bergen Community College, Room TEC 128, 400 Paramus Rd., Paramus, NJ 07652.
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Free Certified Financial Planning Open House at Bergen Community College


Bergen Community College’s Division of Continuing Education will offer free information sessions on the CFP ® Professional Educational Program on Thursday, September 7, from 6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. and Saturday, September 9, from 10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. in Room A-113 of the Pitkin Education Center, Bergen Community College, 400 Paramus Road, Paramus, NJ. The event is open to the public but reservations are recommended. To reserve a seat, please call Ria Bloss in the Division of Continuing Education at 201-447-7466.
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Taking cover: Sunscreen is just part of the picture


TAKE COVER
TAKE COVER
If your idea of sun protection is a quick coating of sunscreen, it's time to rethink your defense strategy.

Relying solely on a dollop of sunscreen to protect your skin from the ravages of the sun is a little like counting on a lap seat belt to completely protect you in a car crash. While both are necessary and can help minimize damage, they're only a part of a smart protection plan.

"Most people don't apply sunscreen often enough or in a large enough quantity to really give protection," says Dr. Kimberly Butterwick, a San Diego dermatologist. "If people would double-up and triple-up on their sun protection - wear clothing, hats and sunglasses, in addition to sunscreen - they could manage to get the kind of sun protection they really need."
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